KDWPT / Fishing / Fishing FAQ / Fishing Programs



Fishing Programs

Find answers to questions about the CFAP, Trout, Urban and F.I.S.H. Programs.

Additional information about all KDWP fisheries programs is available by clicking here.

The Community Fisheries Assistance Program (CFAP) was designed to remove barriers to fishing access and to provide family friendly fishing areas close to where people live.

The F.I.S.H. program,  which stands for Fishing Impoundments and Stream Habitats was patterned after the very successful Walk-In Hunting Access Program with a goal of increasing public fishing opportunities in Kansas.

KDWP created the Urban Fish Stocking Program to improve fishing opportunities in urban areas where the demand for fish exceeds the supply.   All metropolitan areas that have a human population over 40,000, with available public fishing waters, are served by this program. 

Updated: 7/25/05

Anyone fishing for trout in these waters during the periods listed below must purchase a trout permit.  THE PERMIT IS VALID FOR THE CURRENT CALENDAR YEAR. 

Click here to purchase a trout permit online.  

Additional information and stocking locations are available by clicking here.

Oct 15- April 15 Stocking.
The Kansas trout season runs Oct. 15 - April 15. 

Year-Round Stocking
Trout fishing at Mined Land Wildlife Area Unit #30 (CherokeeCounty) and Tuttle Creek Reservoir Seep Stream requires a trout permit year-round.

Updated: 7/25/05

In addition, all of these programs are made possible in conjunction with ponds, lakes and streams not owned by the state - meaning the owner of a water body may choose not to participate in the program.

Updated: 7/25/05

 

The Department's fisheries management programs do not receive any state tax appropriations, but operate entirely on revenues generated directly from anglers in the following ways:

1) Hunting and fishing license fees

2) Sport Fish Restoration Program - a federal program that levies an excise tax on fishing equipment and boat fuel. The Sport Fish Restoration Program apportions money to state wildlife agencies based on a formula that factors in the size of the state and the number of licensed anglers. Kansas receives in excess of $3 million a year. This money is used for fisheries management projects, stocking, capital improvements, research, aquatic education, and boating/fishing access projects such as new and improved boat ramps.